Sponsorship

Religion / Spirituality 10 results

Remains of Native Americans at Rest Again at Angel Mounds

Angel Mounds, outside of Evansville, was a bustling trading hub for Native American people prior to European colonization. Historian Laura Martinez writes about the recent repatriation of the remains of 700 individuals that were excavated from the site in the 1900s — and how, even at sacred places like Angel Mounds, the spiritual practices of Native Americans are still violated. Click here to read about Angel Mounds.

‘100% American’ Hate Groups, Christian Nationalism, and the Indiana KKK

While the Ku Klux Klan in Indiana peaked nearly 100 years ago, its members’ support of Christian nationalism is reflected in various political, militia, and hate groups today. Writer Laurie D. Borman interviewed several experts who suggest the ideologies espoused by today’s far-right groups are a continuation of the country's racist past. Click here to read the article.

Sponsorship

Big Mike’s B-town: Zaineb Istrabadi, Baghdadi Hoosier

Zaineb Istrabadi calls herself “a Baghdadi Hoosier.” Writer Michael G. Glab calls her the apotheosis of a Midwesterner in his profile of the longtime senior lecturer in IU’s Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures. He also calls her “a woman of the world” and a member of one of Bloomington’s most storied families. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: William Morris, ‘Always Teaching’

William Morris, the attorney, radio DJ, and aspiring Episcopal deacon, says the foundation of all his work is teaching. Even on his radio show, The Soul Kitchen, “I’m teaching people different kinds of music,” he says. Michael G. Glab writes about Morris’s rich and varied life in his column, Big Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Abegunde, Writing to Heal

Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde has been given many names, each one representative of her own history, her family’s history, and her Yoruba cultural heritage. And, like her names, Abegunde’s work represents the personal and the historical. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks with the poet and scholar about her work with healing and social justice. Click here to read the full story.

Sponsorship

Standing Rock Protestors: ‘Water Is Life’

Protestors at Standing Rock in North Dakota have a simple message: “Mni Wiconi” — Water is life. Or as Laura Martinez, a Bloomington resident and citizen of the Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas, writes, "Life cannot exist without water. We can survive without oil by investing in renewable energy, but we cannot sustain life without clean water." Click here to read the full story.

Finding Hope in South Sudan: Part 2 Persistent Violence, Unstable Peace

When fighting erupted last August in South Sudan, community-development workers Will and Theresa Reed had to evacuate. They returned to Bloomington to wait out the violence. Now, while the situation in South Sudan fluctuates between unstable and dangerous, the Reeds have returned to Africa, helping refugees in Uganda to find hope. Click here to read the full story.

Powwow Keeps Native American Heritage Alive

Drums beating, feathers flying, hearts racing, spirits soaring — Indiana University’s 5th Annual Traditional Powwow at Alumni Hall this past weekend welcomed dancers, drummers, singers, and other performers from across the land. Miles Reiter filmed the event, which is more than just a social gathering — it’s a ritual of many tribes keeping their heritages alive. Click here to watch the video.

Sponsorship

Finding Hope in South Sudan: Part 1 Getting the Story Out

Will and Theresa Reed moved to South Sudan in 2014 to help the new nation with community development work, mainly to train teachers and build agricultural projects. When conflict in their village erupted, they had to leave their new friends behind. Will, a Bloomington native, tells the story of persecution in the worn-torn country — and the struggle in not allowing the suffering of so many remain someone else’s problems. Click here to read the full story.

Can Yoga Save the World?

Yoga is an ancient practice that has found a purpose in modern times — many purposes, really, with a new type of practice springing up seemingly every week. Yoga practitioner and teacher Samantha Eibling takes you on a path to the origin of yoga, when it was only an oral tradition, to its current state of many incarnations. Along the way, she enlightens you with the physical, mental, and spiritual benefits of yoga that could save the world — or just yourself. Click here to read the full story.