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Poetry 13 results

Writers and Literary Groups Have Taken ‘New Directions’ During Pandemic

The pandemic has affected writers and literary arts organizations in unique ways in the past 19 months, says writer Hiromi Yoshida. Several writers and organization leaders told Yoshida how they continue to work through the changes — and take their writing and organizations in new directions. The results, she writes, are inspirational and uplifting. Click here to read their stories.

Writers Guild Spoken Word Series: Observing Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month

For Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, the Writers Guild at Bloomington is featuring four Asian American performers for the virtual edition of its First Wednesdays Spoken Word Series on May 5. Writer Hiromi Yoshida wrote a preview of the event for LP. “To be Asian, however American, is dangerous in this volatile post-Trump era,” Hiromi writes. Click here for Hiromi’s article.

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Love to See It: Culture & Words Getting Us Through This Thing Called Life

How does pop culture help us express what it is to be human? Jennifer Piurek will explore this and other themes in her Limestone Post column, “Love to See It” — her take on why trends, words, and various art forms help us “both navigate the world and care about life experiences different from our own.” Click here to read Jennifer’s first column!

Abattoir Gallery Challenges Racist and Pandemic Conventions

Abattoir Gallery, at 4th and Rogers streets in Bloomington, will exhibit across mediums while maintaining a safe space for LGBTQ+, Black, and brown people, says its lead curator, Gnat Bowden. Writer Ian Carstens attended the soft opening and says Abattoir “is an open door to the streets of Bloomington to challenge its anti-Black, anti-LGTBQ+ realities.” Click here to read about Abattoir Gallery.

Big Mike’s B-town: Cristian Medina, Scientist, Poet, Chess Leader

Cristian Medina, a poet, cook, IU researcher, and chess leader from Arica, Chile, has found plenty to keep him busy since moving to Bloomington in the mid-2000s. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks to Medina about his hometown — bordered by ocean, mountains, and desert — geology and climate change, his work founding Cardboard House Press, and more in the latest Big-Mike’s B-town. Click here to read the full story.

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Expanded HOPE: Juvenile Offenders Write Poetry to Cope with Incarceration

In writer Ann Georgescu’s third article on HOPE, she looks at how one of the young women used poetry to get her through the long days of incarceration. HOPE is an IU mentorship program for youths in juvenile-detention facilities across Indiana with a mission to help break the school-to-prison pipeline for juvenile offenders. Click here to read the full story.

Beyond Reading, Adult Literacy Is Survival

Literacy is survival. It’s a housing application, a citizenship test, health insurance, a job that can support a family. Writer Michelle Gottschlich says literacy operates on the question, “Does my level of reading and comprehension empower me?” She shows us several groups helping to break down the barriers to literacy — and empowering people in our community. Click here to read the full story.

Big Mike’s B-town: Abegunde, Writing to Heal

Dr. Maria Hamilton Abegunde has been given many names, each one representative of her own history, her family’s history, and her Yoruba cultural heritage. And, like her names, Abegunde’s work represents the personal and the historical. LP columnist Michael G. Glab talks with the poet and scholar about her work with healing and social justice. Click here to read the full story.

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Ross Lockridge Jr., a Great American Tragedy

In 1948, Ross Lockridge Jr. died by suicide in Bloomington just months after his best-selling novel, Raintree County, was published. In 2014, Doug Storm interviewed two of Lockridge’s sons for Interchange, his show on WFHB. Here, Storm writes about the sons’ conflicting opinions on the suicide and the assessment of Raintree County as the Great American Novel. Click here to read the full story.

Page vs. Stage: The ‘Deep Rift’ in Poetry Today

Poet Michelle Gottschlich considers the differences between page and spoken word poetry — between personal histories and “posthuman identity,” between poems expressing unique voice and those searching for universal truths. Acknowledging the impossibility of getting at the heart of it all, she explores the “deep rift” in poetry, known as “Page vs. Stage.” Click here to read the full story.

Poet Chris Mattingly Explains How Vulnerability Is His Greatest Strength

In this interview recorded last summer, poet Chris Mattingly talks with Dave Torneo about how his poetry is informed by everything from a cult in California to “a freak culture” in Evansville. Also posted are poems from each of the Ledge Mule Press co-founders: Mattingly, Torneo, and Ross Gay. Click here to read the full story.

Book by Local Poet Ross Gay Selected as Finalist for the National Book Award

The National Book Foundation just announced the Finalists for the National Book Award. Among them is Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a collection of poems by Indiana University professor Ross Gay. In this profile by Brian Hartz, Gay reflects on his work, on the powerful influence Bloomington has had on his poetry, and what this national recognition means to him. Click here to read the full story.