For this year’s “Sense of Place” project, students in Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at the Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship created 18 videos that reveal how our community has “countless places that people can identify with, each holding a different story,” writes student Lilly Laudeman. The videos also “capture our sense of place,” she says, and they record “why these places mattered so much to us.” Above, a screenshot from Violet Melvin’s video.

Limestone Post is proud to present the 2022 “Sense of Place” project by Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at the Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship. “From the students who talked about the local teen space downtown to our local college campuses,” writes student Lilly Laudeman, “we’ve created these videos that invite you into our special places.” Click here to discover their “Sense of Place.”

Home Sidebar

  • About Us

    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    November 27, 2022

  • Sponsorship

Sponsorship

“She looked me in the eye and wouldn’t let go of my hand.” For most patients with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers, it’s the long goodbye that is the hardest, writes Rebecca Hill. With no cure, not enough trained medical professionals, and an aging population, the U.S. appears unprepared to handle the disease in the coming years. | Illustration by Christian Bowden

No cure. Not enough doctors, nurses, or trained caregivers. Years of research wasted. With an aging population, the U.S. appears unprepared to handle patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the coming years. Rebecca Hill looks at the issue, including diagnosis, treatment options, living with Alzheimer’s disease, and moving toward a more “dementia-friendly place.” Click here for an in-depth reading of Alzheimer’s.

The process of conducting elections has become a focal point for misinformation. AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

The 2022 midterm election season is prime time for misinformation and disinformation on social media. Three social media experts, including Scott Shackelford, professor of Business Law and Ethics at Indiana University, evaluate Facebook, TikTok, Twitter, and YouTube on their ability to handle the problem. This article first appeared in The Conversation and is republished with permission. Click here to see who got a failing grade.

Writer Ruthie Cohen says Crystal Orly’s Ekah Yoga studio, pre-pandemic, was a community destination, with live music events, pot luck gatherings, a community garden, family nights, and kids’ activities. “Post-lockdown has been less rosy,” says Ruthie. But Ekah is hosting a Halloween-themed “Spooktacular Event” to bring the community back. (l-r) Yoga teachers Sarah Peters, Ruthie Cohen, and Marci Becker. | Courtesy photo

Limestone Post columnist Ruthie Cohen says Crystal Orly’s Ekah Yoga studio, pre-pandemic, was a community destination, with live music events, pot luck gatherings, a community garden, family nights, and kids’ activities. “Post-lockdown has been less rosy,” says Ruthie. But Ekah is hosting a Halloween-themed event to bring the community back. Click here to read Ruthie’s article.

Alfred Kinsey’s 1948 book “Sexual Behavior in the Human Male” was a milestone in the study of human sexual behavior. Today, the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University is still conducting cutting-edge research and programs by partnering with groups ranging from schools in rural counties to IU’s School of Medicine and Kelley School of Business. To celebrate its 75th year, the institute commissioned the above sculpture of Kinsey by Melanie Cooper Pennington. | Limestone Post

Kinsey Institute Still on the Cutting-Edge after 75 Years

Alfred Kinsey’s book Sexual Behavior in the Human Male was a milestone in the study of human sexual behavior. Today, after 75 years, the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University is still conducting cutting-edge research and programs by partnering with groups ranging from schools in rural counties to the IU Kelley School of Business. Click here to read the article by Laurie D. Borman.

In a year marked by controversy, Americans’ confidence in the U.S. Supreme Court has hit a historic low. And yet, writes Julia Vaughn, executive director of Common Cause Indiana, the court is set to hear a case that could upend how elections are conducted and make it easier for lawmakers “to gerrymander, suppress the vote, and challenge election results.” | Photo provided

Supreme Court Could Do Even More Damage

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that could upend how elections are conducted, writes Julia Vaughn, executive director of Common Cause Indiana. The court’s decision could make it easier “to gerrymander, suppress the vote, and challenge election results.” First published by Indiana Capital Chronicle, this article is part of Limestone Post’s coverage for Democracy Day. Click here to read more.

By means of partisan gerrymandering, the Indiana legislature has violated the democratic principle of one person, one vote, says retired Indiana University Professor Emeritus Jim Allison. Proportional representation, he says, would help to give Hoosiers “free and fair” elections, as required by the state constitution. | Photo of the Indiana Statehouse via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0; the original uploader was Jasont82 at English Wikipedia.

Indiana Legislature Violates Principle of ‘Free and Equal’ Elections

Retired IU Professor Emeritus Jim Allison shows how the Indiana legislature, by means of partisan gerrymandering, has violated the democratic principle of one person, one vote. Proportional representation, he says, would help to give Hoosiers “free and fair” elections, as required by the state constitution. This article is part of Limestone Post’s coverage for Democracy Day, a nationwide collaborative. Click here to read more.

Since May, the U.S. has gone from zero to more than 15,000 cases of monkeypox, a viral disease that has been declared a public health emergency by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While vaccines exist, supplies are limited, as city, county, and IU health officials prepare for monkeypox cases. | Source: Indiana Department of Health

Monroe County, IU Preparing for Monkeypox Virus

Since May, the U.S. has gone from zero to more than 15,000 cases of monkeypox, a viral disease that has been declared a public health emergency by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While vaccines exist, writes Rebecca Hill, supplies are limited, as local health officials prepare for the virus. Click here to read about what’s being done.

Christine Brackenhoff, the music director and assistant program director at WFHB Bloomington Community Radio, spoke to several members of the Bloomington music scene to find out how the town’s “live music groove” pivoted during the pandemic. Above, the band ForeDaze performing on WFHB’s “Local Live” program in December 2021. (clockwise from right) Alex Cappelli, Marty Abaddi, Ethan Williams, and Carsen Outwater. | Photo by Christine Brackenhoff

Bloomington’s Music Scene Has Pivoted During the Pandemic

“Bloomington has been easing back into its live music groove, with concerts and festivals repopulating our community’s calendars,” writes Christine Brackenhoff, the music director and assistant program director at WFHB Community Radio. To find out how the groove has pivoted after the worst of the pandemic, she spoke with several members of the music community. Click here to read Christine’s article.

The new 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline was created to address the increase in mental health crises. The rise in suicide rates and the pandemic’s impact on mental health have shown more is needed than a crisis hotline, so mental health advocates have designed 988 to be a continuum of mental health care. | Illustration by Christian Bowden

988 Mental Health Lifeline to Include System of Care

The increase in mental health issues has led to the creation of the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. As Rebecca Hill reports, the rise in suicides, serious mental illnesses, and mental health crises has shown more is needed than just a phone number. That’s why advocates designed 988 to be a continuum of care. Click here to read about 988.

“An accurate, basic understanding of America’s history and philosophy is absolutely critical to our continued ability to talk to each other, build community, and function as Americans,” writes Sheila Suess Kennedy, an Emerita Professor of Law and Public Policy at IUPUI. “When people don’t understand when government can properly impose rules and when it can’t, when they don’t understand the most basic premises of our legal system, our public discourse is impoverished and ultimately unproductive.” | Photo via Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

Sheila Kennedy: Civic Literacy ‘Critical’ to a Functioning Democracy

Sheila Suess Kennedy, Emerita Professor of Law and Public Policy, says that when people don’t understand the most basic premises of our legal system, our public discourse is impoverished and ultimately unproductive. “Unfortunately,” she writes, “that civic knowledge is in very short supply.” Click here to read Professor Kennedy’s article on why civic literacy is critical to the American Idea.

People living in intentional communities engage daily in cooperative living. Laura Lasuertmer, a founding member of Common Home Farm north of Bloomington, asked members of four other intentional communities about how the pandemic changed community life. Pictured above are (l-r) David Watters, Huck Watters, David Lasuertmer, and Alice Lasuertmer at Common Home Farm’s “Outdoor Church” in January. | Photo by Laura Lasuertmer

‘We Were Already in This Together’: Pandemic Times in Intentional Community

People living in intentional communities engage daily in cooperative living. How were they affected by the pandemic? How did community life change and adapt? Laura Lasuertmer, a founding member of Common Home Farm in Bloomington, asked members of four other intentional communities how their networks of mutual support weathered the pandemic. | Click here to read Laura’s article.

Sponsorship

  • Random Quote

    “The rise in mental health cases throughout the pandemic led to a growing realization that the U.S. needed a new infrastructure to tackle growing mental health issues. As a result, a designated telephone number, 988, was adopted as an entry point for focusing on mental health crises.” —Rebecca Hill, in "988 Mental Health Lifeline to Include System of Care"
  • Sponsorship

    Sponsorship

    Sponsorship

    Sponsorship