Alfred Kinsey’s 1948 book “Sexual Behavior in the Human Male” was a milestone in the study of human sexual behavior. Today, the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University is still conducting cutting-edge research and programs by partnering with groups ranging from schools in rural counties to IU’s School of Medicine and Kelley School of Business. To celebrate its 75th year, the institute commissioned the above sculpture of Kinsey by Melanie Cooper Pennington. | Limestone Post

Alfred Kinsey’s book Sexual Behavior in the Human Male was a milestone in the study of human sexual behavior. Today, after 75 years, the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University is still conducting cutting-edge research and programs by partnering with groups ranging from schools in rural counties to the IU Kelley School of Business. Click here to read the article by Laurie D. Borman.

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    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    October 5, 2022

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In a year marked by controversy, Americans’ confidence in the U.S. Supreme Court has hit a historic low. And yet, writes Julia Vaughn, executive director of Common Cause Indiana, the court is set to hear a case that could upend how elections are conducted and make it easier for lawmakers “to gerrymander, suppress the vote, and challenge election results.” | Photo provided

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that could upend how elections are conducted, writes Julia Vaughn, executive director of Common Cause Indiana. The court’s decision could make it easier “to gerrymander, suppress the vote, and challenge election results.” First published by Indiana Capital Chronicle, this article is part of Limestone Post’s coverage for Democracy Day. Click here to read more.

By means of partisan gerrymandering, the Indiana legislature has violated the democratic principle of one person, one vote, says retired Indiana University Professor Emeritus Jim Allison. Proportional representation, he says, would help to give Hoosiers “free and fair” elections, as required by the state constitution. | Photo of the Indiana Statehouse via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0; the original uploader was Jasont82 at English Wikipedia.

Retired IU Professor Emeritus Jim Allison shows how the Indiana legislature, by means of partisan gerrymandering, has violated the democratic principle of one person, one vote. Proportional representation, he says, would help to give Hoosiers “free and fair” elections, as required by the state constitution. This article is part of Limestone Post’s coverage for Democracy Day, a nationwide collaborative. Click here to read more.

Since May, the U.S. has gone from zero to more than 15,000 cases of monkeypox, a viral disease that has been declared a public health emergency by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While vaccines exist, supplies are limited, as city, county, and IU health officials prepare for monkeypox cases. | Source: Indiana Department of Health

Since May, the U.S. has gone from zero to more than 15,000 cases of monkeypox, a viral disease that has been declared a public health emergency by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While vaccines exist, writes Rebecca Hill, supplies are limited, as local health officials prepare for the virus. Click here to read about what’s being done.

Christine Brackenhoff, the music director and assistant program director at WFHB Bloomington Community Radio, spoke to several members of the Bloomington music scene to find out how the town’s “live music groove” pivoted during the pandemic. Above, the band ForeDaze performing on WFHB’s “Local Live” program in December 2021. (clockwise from right) Alex Cappelli, Marty Abaddi, Ethan Williams, and Carsen Outwater. | Photo by Christine Brackenhoff

Bloomington’s Music Scene Has Pivoted During the Pandemic

“Bloomington has been easing back into its live music groove, with concerts and festivals repopulating our community’s calendars,” writes Christine Brackenhoff, the music director and assistant program director at WFHB Community Radio. To find out how the groove has pivoted after the worst of the pandemic, she spoke with several members of the music community. Click here to read Christine’s article.

The new 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline was created to address the increase in mental health crises. The rise in suicide rates and the pandemic’s impact on mental health have shown more is needed than a crisis hotline, so mental health advocates have designed 988 to be a continuum of mental health care. | Illustration by Christian Bowden

988 Mental Health Lifeline to Include System of Care

The increase in mental health issues has led to the creation of the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. As Rebecca Hill reports, the rise in suicides, serious mental illnesses, and mental health crises has shown more is needed than just a phone number. That’s why advocates designed 988 to be a continuum of care. Click here to read about 988.

“An accurate, basic understanding of America’s history and philosophy is absolutely critical to our continued ability to talk to each other, build community, and function as Americans,” writes Sheila Suess Kennedy, an Emerita Professor of Law and Public Policy at IUPUI. “When people don’t understand when government can properly impose rules and when it can’t, when they don’t understand the most basic premises of our legal system, our public discourse is impoverished and ultimately unproductive.” | Photo via Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

Sheila Kennedy: Civic Literacy ‘Critical’ to a Functioning Democracy

Sheila Suess Kennedy, Emerita Professor of Law and Public Policy, says that when people don’t understand the most basic premises of our legal system, our public discourse is impoverished and ultimately unproductive. “Unfortunately,” she writes, “that civic knowledge is in very short supply.” Click here to read Professor Kennedy’s article on why civic literacy is critical to the American Idea.

People living in intentional communities engage daily in cooperative living. Laura Lasuertmer, a founding member of Common Home Farm north of Bloomington, asked members of four other intentional communities about how the pandemic changed community life. Pictured above are (l-r) David Watters, Huck Watters, David Lasuertmer, and Alice Lasuertmer at Common Home Farm’s “Outdoor Church” in January. | Photo by Laura Lasuertmer

‘We Were Already in This Together’: Pandemic Times in Intentional Community

People living in intentional communities engage daily in cooperative living. How were they affected by the pandemic? How did community life change and adapt? Laura Lasuertmer, a founding member of Common Home Farm in Bloomington, asked members of four other intentional communities how their networks of mutual support weathered the pandemic. | Click here to read Laura’s article.

Jacinda Townsend was associate professor of English at Indiana University in 2014 when her debut novel, ‘St. Monkey,’ was published. Now the Helen Zell Visiting Professor in Fiction at the University of Michigan, Townsend is already receiving praise for her new novel, ‘Mother Country,’ which came out in May. She will be at Morgenstern Books on Monday, June 6, for a conversation with Yaël Ksander. | Courtesy photo

A Conversation with Jacinda Townsend, Author of ‘Mother Country’

Jacinda Townsend’s new novel, Mother Country, tackles the subject of motherhood from two perspectives on different sides of the world. Yaël Ksander spoke with Townsend for WFIU’s Inner States program, and she is sharing excerpts of that interview with Limestone Post. Townsend and Ksander will meet again, in person, at Morgenstern Books on June 6. Click here to read their conversation

In ‘A Checkered Past,’ Al Unser Jr. and Jade Gurss write a book that racing fans will enjoy, says Rebecca Hill in this review. But the book reveals two Al Unser Jrs. — one who is successful at racing and another who fails at his personal life.

‘A Checkered Past’ by Indy Racing Legend Al Unser Jr.

As part of a heralded racing family, Al Unser Jr. “grew up on the fumes from Gasoline Alley,” says Rebecca Hill in her review of Unser’s book, A Checkered Past. While Unser lived up to the family name on the track, his racing success did not always follow him off the track. Click here to read the review.

Monroe Convention Center opened in 1991 in the Graham Auto Sales building (built in 1923) at the corner of West 3rd Street and South College Avenue. Even then, local tourism officials argued it needed to be larger to attract even medium-size conventions. Now, though, some officials wonder if this is the right time to expand. | Photo by Limestone Post

Expanding Monroe Convention Center Still Faces Uphill Battle

With tourism picking up again, many local leaders want to pursue the pre-pandemic plans to expand Monroe Convention Center. But some key decision makers are not convinced, writes Steve Hinnefeld. They question if this is the right time to expand, and whether convention-business revenue will have the desired kind of economic impact. Click here to read Hinnefeld’s in-depth story.

Bloomington’s recording studios have faced many pandemic challenges in the past two years. Jake Belser (above), owner of Primary Sound Studios, found that remote mixing and collaborative productions were key to mitigating the impact of the COVID lockdown. | Photo by Jim Manion

The Pandemic Changed How Local Recording Studios Make Music

Bloomington’s recording studios have faced many pandemic challenges over the past two years. Jim Manion, the former music director at WFHB Community Radio, spoke to the owners of Russian Recording, Noisy Chairs Recording, Airtime Studios, and Primary Sound Studios to see how they coped — and continued to create music — during COVID. Click here to read Manion’s article.

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    “I was trying my best to impress a guy. So I came home one day and found two dead flies lying next to one another. I picked the two flies up, put them on paper, drew around them, and I’ve done it every day since. The guy never worked out.” —Ali Beckman, in "Bugs Come to Life in Ali Beckman’s So Fly Taxidermy" by Dason Anderson
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