In ‘A Checkered Past,’ Al Unser Jr. and Jade Gurss write a book that racing fans will enjoy, says Rebecca Hill in this review. But the book reveals two Al Unser Jrs. — one who is successful at racing and another who fails at his personal life.

As part of a heralded racing family, Al Unser Jr. “grew up on the fumes from Gasoline Alley,” says Rebecca Hill in her review of Unser’s book, A Checkered Past. While Unser lived up to the family name on the track, his racing success did not always follow him off the track. Click here to read the review.

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    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    May 27, 2022

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Monroe Convention Center opened in 1991 in the Graham Auto Sales building (built in 1923) at the corner of West 3rd Street and South College Avenue. Even then, local tourism officials argued it needed to be larger to attract even medium-size conventions. Now, though, some officials wonder if this is the right time to expand. | Photo by Limestone Post

With tourism picking up again, many local leaders want to pursue the pre-pandemic plans to expand Monroe Convention Center. But some key decision makers are not convinced, writes Steve Hinnefeld. They question if this is the right time to expand, and whether convention-business revenue will have the desired kind of economic impact. Click here to read Hinnefeld’s in-depth story.

Bloomington’s recording studios have faced many pandemic challenges in the past two years. Jake Belser (above), owner of Primary Sound Studios, found that remote mixing and collaborative productions were key to mitigating the impact of the COVID lockdown. | Photo by Jim Manion

Bloomington’s recording studios have faced many pandemic challenges over the past two years. Jim Manion, the former music director at WFHB Community Radio, spoke to the owners of Russian Recording, Noisy Chairs Recording, Airtime Studios, and Primary Sound Studios to see how they coped — and continued to create music — during COVID. Click here to read Manion’s article.

To vote in person, either early or on election day, you will need an ID issued by the U.S. or Indiana government.

The League of Women Voters of Bloomington-Monroe County has created this quick-reference guide on voter registration, voting by mail, and various voting requirements. This is the first in a series of articles on civic engagement produced by LWV for Limestone Post.
Click here to read the guide.

Surviving cancer depends on many factors, but dealing with it requires help. Because of improved treatments and surgeries, death is no longer the endgame for some cancers. But the road to survivorship requires a continuum of care — and “an army” to defeat it. | Illustration by Christian Bowden

Cancer Requires a Continuum of Care — and an ‘Army’ to Defeat It

Surviving cancer depends on many factors, but dealing with it requires help. It’s not a single-issue disease, writes Rebecca Hill. Because of improved treatments and surgeries, death is no longer the endgame for some cancers. But the road to survivorship requires a continuum of care — and ‘an army’ to defeat it. Click here to read about the continuum of cancer care.

Denise Breeden-Ost’s “Making It All Right” and Greta Lind’s “Split Open” each portrays the life of a wife and mother “smashing up against” expectations “to deliver their own form of rebellion,” says Yaël Ksander in her review of these two debut novels by Indiana authors.

Two Novels by Indiana Authors ‘Deliver Their Own Form of Rebellion’

Yaël Ksander reviews two debut novels by Indiana authors that address the question “Can a woman have it all?” Denise Breeden-Ost’s Making It All Right and Greta Lind’s Split Open each portrays the life of a wife and mother “smashing up against” expectations “to deliver their own form of rebellion.” Click here to read Yaël’s review.

Mississippi State Sen. Joseph Thomas, D-Yazoo City, holds a copy of the proposed congressional redistricting map during debate over redistricting at the Mississippi State Capitol in Jackson, January 12, 2022. | AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

How Redistricting Congressional Districts Can Undermine Majority Rule

“In a democracy, voters choose their political leaders. In a democracy that permits gerrymandering … elected leaders choose their voters.” Marjorie Hershey, Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Indiana University, wrote this in an article for “The Conversation,” an independent news organization. She has updated the article for Limestone Post. Click here to read her article on redistricting.

Nancy Hiller’s latest book, ‘Shop Tails: The Animals Who Help Us Make Things Work,’ is ostensibly about the animals who have accompanied her during her distinguished career as a woodworker. But as reviewer Yaël Ksander writes, ‘Rebel Girl’ Hiller has done this before: use her craft to talk about broader issues. In this case, ‘Shop Tails’ isn’t just another publishing achievement, ‘it’s an artifact of the deep healing Hiller knew she could no longer put off.’

‘Shop Tails: The Animals Who Help Us Make Things Work’ by Nancy Hiller Book Review by Yaël Ksander for the Limestone Reader

You won’t get too far into Nancy Hiller’s new book, Shop Tails: The Animals Who Help Us Make Things Work, without realizing you’re reading more than a book about critters, writes Yaël Ksander in her review for the Limestone Reader. This isn’t the first time Hiller has used woodworking to explore much bigger issues, but Shop Tails was written “at a reckoning point.” Click here to read Yaël’s review.

Researchers have examined the effectiveness of preparation versus security when addressing mass shootings. For this in-depth article, Rebecca Hill interviewed several local and national experts and compiled data on using a public health approach. | Photo by NEOSiAM 2021 from Pexels

Preparation vs. Security in Preventing Mass Shootings

As a nation, mass shootings are “part of our social fabric,” writes Rebecca Hill. She interviewed several local and national experts on how to better address mass shootings, especially in schools and businesses. Her in-depth report looks at research on mass shootings through a public health approach — and the effectiveness of preparation versus security. Click here to read the article.

Each fall since 2016, Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have completed a class project called “Sense of Place” and shared their work with Limestone Post. This year’s students created videos portraying a variety of unique places: a horse stable, a family homestead, a limestone mill, Dunn Meadow, Community Kitchen, Rose Hill Cemetery, the B-Line Trail, Jackson Creek Middle School, and Monroe Lake. Pictured is a screenshot of Woolery Mill from Ambrose Lee’s video.

What the ‘Sense of Place’ Project by ASE Students Can Teach Us

Students in Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship share their annual “Sense of Place” project with Limestone Post! While their unique “places” are as varied as a horse stable, a limestone mill, Dunn Meadow, Community Kitchen, and Monroe Lake, their videos teach us what we share as a community. Click here to learn about the project and watch their videos!

Steve Hinnefeld was a reporter at the Herald-Times from 1980 to 2007, when it employed up to 59 people in the newsroom. Now it has 12. Limestone Post asked Hinnefeld to look at several media outlets that report the daily news in Bloomington. He found that the local news landscape has changed dramatically in the past few years.

Changes in Daily Local News Landscape Have Consequences

What happens when local news coverage disappears? Limestone Post asked journalist Steve Hinnefeld to look at the daily news landscape in Bloomington. He interviewed people at several local news outlets and filed this report. The landscape has changed recently in subtle and dramatic ways — some for the better, some not so much. Click here to read about who’s reporting B-town’s daily news.

In this inaugural edition of Limestone Post’s “The Limestone Reader Book Review” column, Yaël Ksander looks at Ian Woollen’s fifth novel, “Sister City,” which she calls a “wickedly whimsical satire” that connects fictional “sister cities” in Indiana and Mexico. Yaël says Woollen, who lives in Bloomington, writes in the tradition of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut.

The Limestone Reader Book Review: ‘Sister City’ by Ian Woollen

In this inaugural edition of The Limestone Reader Book Review, Yaël Ksander looks at Ian Woollen’s fifth novel, Sister City, which she calls a “wickedly whimsical satire” that connects fictional “sister cities” in Indiana and Mexico. Yaël says Woollen, who lives in Bloomington, writes in the tradition of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Click here to read the inaugural Limestone Reader Book Review.

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  • Random Quote

    “I was trying my best to impress a guy. So I came home one day and found two dead flies lying next to one another. I picked the two flies up, put them on paper, drew around them, and I’ve done it every day since. The guy never worked out.” —Ali Beckman, in "Bugs Come to Life in Ali Beckman’s So Fly Taxidermy" by Dason Anderson
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