Each fall since 2016, Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship have completed a class project called “Sense of Place” and shared their work with Limestone Post. This year’s students created videos portraying a variety of unique places: a horse stable, a family homestead, a limestone mill, Dunn Meadow, Community Kitchen, Rose Hill Cemetery, the B-Line Trail, Jackson Creek Middle School, and Monroe Lake. Pictured is a screenshot of Woolery Mill from Ambrose Lee’s video.

Students in Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship share their annual “Sense of Place” project with Limestone Post! While their unique “places” are as varied as a horse stable, a limestone mill, Dunn Meadow, Community Kitchen, and Monroe Lake, their videos teach us what we share as a community. Click here to learn about the project and watch their videos!

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    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    November 26, 2021

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Steve Hinnefeld was a reporter at the Herald-Times from 1980 to 2007, when it employed up to 59 people in the newsroom. Now it has 12. Limestone Post asked Hinnefeld to look at several media outlets that report the daily news in Bloomington. He found that the local news landscape has changed dramatically in the past few years.

What happens when local news coverage disappears? Limestone Post asked journalist Steve Hinnefeld to look at the daily news landscape in Bloomington. He interviewed people at several local news outlets and filed this report. The landscape has changed recently in subtle and dramatic ways — some for the better, some not so much. Click here to read about who’s reporting B-town’s daily news.

In this inaugural edition of Limestone Post’s “The Limestone Reader Book Review” column, Yaël Ksander looks at Ian Woollen’s fifth novel, “Sister City,” which she calls a “wickedly whimsical satire” that connects fictional “sister cities” in Indiana and Mexico. Yaël says Woollen, who lives in Bloomington, writes in the tradition of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut.

In this inaugural edition of The Limestone Reader Book Review, Yaël Ksander looks at Ian Woollen’s fifth novel, Sister City, which she calls a “wickedly whimsical satire” that connects fictional “sister cities” in Indiana and Mexico. Yaël says Woollen, who lives in Bloomington, writes in the tradition of John Irving and Kurt Vonnegut. Click here to read the inaugural Limestone Reader Book Review.

The pandemic has affected writers and literary arts organizations in unique ways in the past 19 months. Writer Hiromi Yoshida interviewed several writers and organization leaders to learn how they continue to work through the changes — and take their writing and organizations in new directions. The results are, she writes, inspirational and uplifting. | Illustration by Christian Bowden

The pandemic has affected writers and literary arts organizations in unique ways in the past 19 months, says writer Hiromi Yoshida. Several writers and organization leaders told Yoshida how they continue to work through the changes — and take their writing and organizations in new directions. The results, she writes, are inspirational and uplifting. Click here to read their stories.

The Opioid Rapid Response System recruits citizen responders to help prevent overdose deaths when emergency medical services cannot respond quickly enough. A smartphone app notifies citizen responders when 911 calls report any unconscious or unresponsive event, including a drug overdose. The program is a collaboration between Real Prevention, LLC, and Prevention Insights, a part of the Indiana University School of Public Health. | Limestone Post

Indiana Counties Use Opioid Rapid Response System To Combat Overdoses

The drug naloxone can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, potentially saving a person’s life. In collaboration with IU and other groups, Monroe and several other Indiana counties are creating a network of “citizen responders” who are trained in the Opioid Rapid Response System to administer naloxone when emergency medical services cannot respond quickly enough. Click here to read about ORRS and naloxone.

It wasn’t until Sean Chung volunteered for a local environmental group that he realized how destructive invasive plants were to the integrity of local ecosystems. In Monroe County, the invasion is held at bay by individuals, neighborhood associations, nonprofit organizations, local government, and even the U.S. Forest Service. The Park Ridge East neighborhood, for example, took advantage of a city grant program to install a native plant garden (pictured) to provide a habitat for butterflies and other pollinators. | Limestone Post

Keeping Invasive Plants at Bay to Prevent ‘Ecological Collapse’

Before volunteering for a local environmental group, Sean Chung was unaware of the problems invasive plants were causing here in Monroe County and “every single community in the U.S.” For this article, he interviewed people working to “contain the invasion” and prevent the kind of “ecological collapse” that invasives can cause. Click here to read the article.

For more than two decades, the opioid epidemic has raged in small rural towns and in the suburbs. But what happens when the opioid epidemic collides with the COVID pandemic? Rebecca Hill interviewed people on the front lines of these crises to report about how people in Bloomington and other southern Indiana communities are working on the problem. | Map: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2021, cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm

What Happens When an Opioid Epidemic Collides with the COVID Pandemic?

For more than two decades, the opioid epidemic has raged on in small rural towns and in the suburbs. But what happens when the opioid epidemic collides with the COVID pandemic? Rebecca Hill writes about these “waves” of crises in Bloomington and other southern Indiana communities, and how people are weathering it. Click here to read the story.

Angel Mounds Historic Site, along the Ohio River just east of Evansville, was a bustling town and trading hub for Native American people during the Mississippian Culture Period, prior to European colonization. Beginning in the 1930s, the remains of 700 individuals were excavated from the site and stored at Indiana University until March 2021, when they were repatriated. | Photo by Laura Martinez

Remains of Native Americans at Rest Again at Angel Mounds

Angel Mounds, outside of Evansville, was a bustling trading hub for Native American people prior to European colonization. Historian Laura Martinez writes about the recent repatriation of the remains of 700 individuals that were excavated from the site in the 1900s — and how, even at sacred places like Angel Mounds, the spiritual practices of Native Americans are still violated. Click here to read about Angel Mounds.

Within a two-hour drive from Bloomington, you can take road trips to such diverse places as quintessential Hoosier small towns and atypical Hoosier landscapes (pictured above, the DePauw Nature Park). As writer Diane Walker says, these fun, unusual, and affordable destinations will nourish our mental and physical health with hiking, exploring, and exercising our curiosity — and help us to emerge from our ‘unprecedented isolation.’ | Limestone Post

Road Trips to Waterfalls, Small Towns, and Unusual Hoosier Locales

All of us need a fun break, especially after 14 months of unprecedented isolation, and what’s a better getaway than a good road trip? Writer Diane Walker takes us to waterfalls, small towns, and several fun, affordable, and unusual sites on these “road trips of distinction” — all within a two-hour drive of Bloomington. Click here to join the ride!

Research by Alex Jahn at Indiana University has focused on the rarely studied American robin. For Jahn, birds are sentinels because they can predict what is happening to our ecosystem. Jahn and other researchers around the world use technology such as satellite telemetry to understand how migration affects the lives of birds. With a reported 30 percent of bird species lost since the 1970s, writes Rebecca Hill, the information gathered is more important than ever. | Photo by Skyler Ewing

Keeping Track of Migrating Birds, the ‘Sentinels’ of Our Ecosystem

In 1803, James Audubon tracked birds by tying thread around their legs. Researchers around the world now use technology such as satellite telemetry to understand how migration affects these “sentinels” of our ecosystem. With a reported 30 percent of bird species lost since the 1970s, writes Rebecca Hill, the information gathered is more important than ever. Click here to read the article.

Recent mass shootings have ignited conversations about “the precarious ambiguity about what it means to be Asian American,” says Hiromi Yoshida, a freelance writer, editor, and diversity consultant for the Writers Guild at Bloomington. For Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, the Writers Guild will feature four Asian American performers for the virtual edition of its First Wednesdays Spoken Word Series on May 5. “To be Asian, however American, is dangerous in this volatile post-Trump era,” Hiromi writes. | Courtesy images.

Writers Guild Spoken Word Series: Observing Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month

For Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, the Writers Guild at Bloomington is featuring four Asian American performers for the virtual edition of its First Wednesdays Spoken Word Series on May 5. Writer Hiromi Yoshida wrote a preview of the event for LP. “To be Asian, however American, is dangerous in this volatile post-Trump era,” Hiromi writes. Click here for Hiromi’s article.

Bachelor Nation is the love–hate cultural bubble comprising the fans, podcasts, blogs, and adjacent programming of reality shows ‘The Bachelor’ and ‘The Bachelorette.’ This spring, real-life drama involving racism, sexism, inclusivity, and diversity have taken center stage. Jennifer Piurek explains it all in this article for her LP column ‘Love to See It.’ | Image by Jenny El-Shamy

Love to See It: Eats, Shoots and Leaves Bachelor Mansion

Bachelor Nation is the love–hate cultural bubble comprising the fans, podcasts, blogs, and adjacent programming of reality shows The Bachelor and The Bachelorette. This spring, real-life drama involving racism, sexism, inclusivity, and diversity have taken center stage. Jennifer Piurek explains it all in this article for her LP column Love to See It. Click here to read Jennifer’s column.

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    “I was trying my best to impress a guy. So I came home one day and found two dead flies lying next to one another. I picked the two flies up, put them on paper, drew around them, and I’ve done it every day since. The guy never worked out.” —Ali Beckman, in "Bugs Come to Life in Ali Beckman’s So Fly Taxidermy" by Dason Anderson
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