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Nutrition 25 results

The Long Goodbye: Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

No cure. Not enough doctors, nurses, or trained caregivers. Years of research wasted. With an aging population, the U.S. appears unprepared to handle patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the coming years. Rebecca Hill looks at the issue, including diagnosis, treatment options, living with Alzheimer’s disease, and moving toward a more “dementia-friendly place.” Click here for an in-depth reading of Alzheimer’s.

Stirring the Pot: The Little Yoga Studio That Could

Limestone Post columnist Ruthie Cohen says Crystal Orly’s Ekah Yoga studio, pre-pandemic, was a community destination, with live music events, pot luck gatherings, a community garden, family nights, and kids’ activities. “Post-lockdown has been less rosy,” says Ruthie. But Ekah is hosting a Halloween-themed event to bring the community back. Click here to read Ruthie’s article.

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Healthcare and the Impact of COVID-19 in So. Indiana Counties

The most significant health threats faced by Hoosiers living in southern Indiana's rural counties are chronic disease, substance abuse, and mental health issues. Another threat is access to healthcare, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Writer Rebecca Hill looks at the problem of rural healthcare access and what various individuals and organizations are doing to help. Click here to read the article.

Stirring the Pot: Valeria Dreams of Paprika

Ruthie Cohen stirs the pot this month with paprika-rich Hungarian bean soup, courtesy of Valeria Varga, senior lecturer in IU’s Hungarian Studies program. Hungary is known for its paprika, and Valeria makes cooking demonstrations an essential part of her summer courses. “There is nothing like the aroma and the color of paprika,” Valeria says. Click here for the story and recipe!

Stirring the Pot: Spice Girl

Limestone Post’s food sage, Ruthie Cohen, settles a domestic dispute by offering us recipes inspired by her daughter Leigh, the last of the Cohen kids to be featured in her column. Ruthie says Leigh “embodies the essential ingredients that ignite: a zest for life, a fire in her belly, a brash sizzle, and a subtle hint of sweetness.” Click here for Ruthie’s Leigh-inspired recipes.

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New People’s Open Pantry Offers Access to Healthy Food

Building equity and supporting community access to healthy food are at the heart of the People’s Open Pantry, a new initiative under the aegis of the People’s Market, writes Ellen Wu. But starting a pantry during a pandemic takes dedication and planning. Wu talked to several of the people involved in the effort. Click here to read the story.

Hoosiers Take On Home Gardening

Home gardens not only create access to healthy food, they also offer physical, mental health, economic, and environmental benefits, writes Beth Edwards of the Indiana Environmental Reporter. No wonder home gardening has gained in popularity every year since the 2008 financial crisis. Sheltering at home has even more Hoosiers digging in. Click here to learn more.

Ethos of New People’s Market Focuses on Food Justice, Mutual Aid

A group of vendors, community organizers, and university professors began meeting last year to plan what would become the People’s Market, “a farmers market model unprecedented in Bloomington and Indiana,” writes IU history professor Ellen Wu. When COVID-19 “upended everything,” the group quickly reoriented to create a drive-thru CSA. Click here to read about the People’s Market.

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Stirring the Pot: Ruthie’s Plant Power Recipes

For too many reasons to ignore, LP food columnist Ruthie Cohen says her lifelong love affair with dairy, eggs, meat, poultry, and fish has come to an end. But the breakup is not heartbreaking. Rather, she's now in a healthier relationship with a little more spice — and grains, beans, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Click here for four of Ruthie’s recipes that harness plant power.

Suppress Dieting, Not Hunger, with Intuitive Eating

For many, suppressing the feeling of hunger with restrictive diets only leads to more-intense levels of hunger, writes Amanda Boyer. Think “hangry.” But the practice of intuitive eating — eating in a way that honors and respects your body’s hunger, fullness, and cravings — could be a more healthful and pleasurable approach to food, without dieting. Click here to read the full story.

Small Farms Are Putting the ‘Community’ in CSAs

Local farms that participate in Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs offer more than just fresh produce. Not only do they make us feel better about how our food is produced, they also create community and enforce a sense of purpose, writes Jared Posey. While CSAs give us far more than we pay for, are they at risk? Click here to read the full story.

Making Organic Food Affordable

Foods from who-knows-where, loaded with marketing claims that mean who-knows-what, can make finding a healthful meal a nightmare, writes Jared Posey. He shares his tips on how to make organic food more affordable — from growing your own organic produce to making your own organic “value-added” products. Click here to read the full story.