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Healthy Living 132 results

Monroe County, IU Preparing for Monkeypox Virus

Since May, the U.S. has gone from zero to more than 15,000 cases of monkeypox, a viral disease that has been declared a public health emergency by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. While vaccines exist, writes Rebecca Hill, supplies are limited, as local health officials prepare for the virus. Click here to read about what’s being done.

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988 Mental Health Lifeline to Include System of Care

The increase in mental health issues has led to the creation of the 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. As Rebecca Hill reports, the rise in suicides, serious mental illnesses, and mental health crises has shown more is needed than just a phone number. That’s why advocates designed 988 to be a continuum of care. Click here to read about 988.

‘We Were Already in This Together’: Pandemic Times in Intentional Community

People living in intentional communities engage daily in cooperative living. How were they affected by the pandemic? How did community life change and adapt? Laura Lasuertmer, a founding member of Common Home Farm in Bloomington, asked members of four other intentional communities how their networks of mutual support weathered the pandemic. | Click here to read Laura’s article.

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The Pandemic Changed How Local Recording Studios Make Music

Bloomington’s recording studios have faced many pandemic challenges over the past two years. Jim Manion, the former music director at WFHB Community Radio, spoke to the owners of Russian Recording, Noisy Chairs Recording, Airtime Studios, and Primary Sound Studios to see how they coped — and continued to create music — during COVID. Click here to read Manion’s article.

Cancer Requires a Continuum of Care — and an ‘Army’ to Defeat It

Surviving cancer depends on many factors, but dealing with it requires help. It’s not a single-issue disease, writes Rebecca Hill. Because of improved treatments and surgeries, death is no longer the endgame for some cancers. But the road to survivorship requires a continuum of care — and ‘an army’ to defeat it. Click here to read about the continuum of cancer care.

Two Novels by Indiana Authors ‘Deliver Their Own Form of Rebellion’

Yaël Ksander reviews two debut novels by Indiana authors that address the question “Can a woman have it all?” Denise Breeden-Ost’s Making It All Right and Greta Lind’s Split Open each portrays the life of a wife and mother “smashing up against” expectations “to deliver their own form of rebellion.” Click here to read Yaël’s review.

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‘Shop Tails: The Animals Who Help Us Make Things Work’ by Nancy Hiller Book Review by Yaël Ksander for the Limestone Reader

You won’t get too far into Nancy Hiller’s new book, Shop Tails: The Animals Who Help Us Make Things Work, without realizing you’re reading more than a book about critters, writes Yaël Ksander in her review for the Limestone Reader. This isn’t the first time Hiller has used woodworking to explore much bigger issues, but Shop Tails was written “at a reckoning point.” Click here to read Yaël’s review.

Preparation vs. Security in Preventing Mass Shootings

As a nation, mass shootings are “part of our social fabric,” writes Rebecca Hill. She interviewed several local and national experts on how to better address mass shootings, especially in schools and businesses. Her in-depth report looks at research on mass shootings through a public health approach — and the effectiveness of preparation versus security. Click here to read the article.

What the ‘Sense of Place’ Project by ASE Students Can Teach Us

Students in Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at Bloomington’s Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship share their annual “Sense of Place” project with Limestone Post! While their unique “places” are as varied as a horse stable, a limestone mill, Dunn Meadow, Community Kitchen, and Monroe Lake, their videos teach us what we share as a community. Click here to learn about the project and watch their videos!

Writers and Literary Groups Have Taken ‘New Directions’ During Pandemic

The pandemic has affected writers and literary arts organizations in unique ways in the past 19 months, says writer Hiromi Yoshida. Several writers and organization leaders told Yoshida how they continue to work through the changes — and take their writing and organizations in new directions. The results, she writes, are inspirational and uplifting. Click here to read their stories.