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Deep Dive: Struggling with Housing Supply, Stability, and Subsidies, Part 1 WFHB and Limestone Post Investigate

This article on local housing issues is our first in a series, called “Deep Dive: WFHB & Limestone Post Investigate,” a collaboration between WFHB Community Radio and Limestone Post, made possible by a grant from the Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County. This is part 1 of 2 in journalist Steve Hinnefeld’s report on housing. Click here to read the article and learn more about Deep Dive.

Arts Alliance Mission to Connect Artists, Art Users, and Art Advocates

Artists and art advocates created the Arts Alliance of Greater Bloomington in 2010 to be a path for communication and a network of resources for members. Recently, writes Emily Williams, the organization has focused on connecting with other arts organizations, relaunching its online directory, and managing its space in College Mall, the Arts Alliance Center. Click here to read Emily’s story.

Times of Israel Podcast with IU Prof. Alvin Rosenfeld ‘Antisemitism is now a form of entertainment — and that’s new’

Prof. Alvin H. Rosenfeld is the founder and director of the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism at Indiana University. On a recent trip to Jerusalem, he was interviewed on a podcast by Amanda Borschel-Dan, an IU alumna who is now deputy editor at The Times of Israel. Among other topics, they discussed how antisemitism is now “a form of entertainment.” Click here to hear the podcast and read the transcript.

Climate Solutions for Great Lakes Power Grid Include Better Planning, Transmission Advocates say electric grid operators need to update their planning process to better prepare for extreme weather that is becoming more common, and that more transmission lines can help lessen the risk of blackouts. 

Advocates say electric grid operators in the Great Lakes region need to update their planning process to better prepare for extreme weather that is becoming more common, and that more transmission lines can help lessen the risk of blackouts. This report is part of a collaborative series from several publications examining climate resilience across the Great Lakes region. Click here to read the article.

Anthropologist’s Tips for Digging Into Your Relatives’ Past Over the Holidays, Try Talking to Your Relatives Like an Anthropologist

Anthropologist Elizabeth Keating was close with her parents. Yet after they passed away, she had many questions she wished she had asked. Keating has used her scholarly training to write a guide for how to question family members about their past. You could use Keating’s tips during the holidays for getting to know your family members even better. | Click here for Keating’s tips!

Guest Column: Response to ‘The Long Goodbye: Living with Alzheimer’s Disease’

Kathryn Moyle, Ph.D., a dementia advocate for the the Dementia Australia Research Foundation, has written a response to Rebecca Hill’s article “The Long Goodbye: Living with Alzheimer’s Disease,” published recently in Limestone Post. Rebecca’s reporting on treatment, research, and other aspects of the disease were pertinent, but none resonates as much, Kathryn writes, as how loved ones lose their identity. Click here for more on Living with Alzheimer’s.

‘Sense of Place’ 2022 by Students at Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship

Limestone Post is proud to present the 2022 “Sense of Place” project by Rachel Bahr’s English 11 class at the Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship. “From the students who talked about the local teen space downtown to our local college campuses,” writes student Lilly Laudeman, “we’ve created these videos that invite you into our special places.” Click here to discover their “Sense of Place.”

The Long Goodbye: Living with Alzheimer’s Disease

No cure. Not enough doctors, nurses, or trained caregivers. Years of research wasted. With an aging population, the U.S. appears unprepared to handle patients with Alzheimer’s disease in the coming years. Rebecca Hill looks at the issue, including diagnosis, treatment options, living with Alzheimer’s disease, and moving toward a more “dementia-friendly place.” Click here for an in-depth reading of Alzheimer’s.

Experts Grade Social Media Companies on Midterm Misinformation

The 2022 midterm election season is prime time for misinformation and disinformation on social media. Three social media experts, including Scott Shackelford, professor of Business Law and Ethics at Indiana University, evaluate Facebook, TikTok, Twitter, and YouTube on their ability to handle the problem. This article first appeared in The Conversation and is republished with permission. Click here to see who got a failing grade.

Stirring the Pot: The Little Yoga Studio That Could

Limestone Post columnist Ruthie Cohen says Crystal Orly’s Ekah Yoga studio, pre-pandemic, was a community destination, with live music events, pot luck gatherings, a community garden, family nights, and kids’ activities. “Post-lockdown has been less rosy,” says Ruthie. But Ekah is hosting a Halloween-themed event to bring the community back. Click here to read Ruthie’s article.

Supreme Court Could Do Even More Damage

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that could upend how elections are conducted, writes Julia Vaughn, executive director of Common Cause Indiana. The court’s decision could make it easier “to gerrymander, suppress the vote, and challenge election results.” First published by Indiana Capital Chronicle, this article is part of Limestone Post’s coverage for Democracy Day. Click here to read more.