Mark Stosberg (left) and Taufique Hussain on Maple Grove Road during a recent 21-mile run (which Stosberg says became a 26.7-mile run). | Limestone Post

One recent winter, Mark Stosberg set out on a 50-mile run. He wasn’t racing in or training for an event, so at some point he had to answer the question, Why keep going? To test his physical and mental limits? To satisfy a primal instinct? Or was it therapeutic in some way? Sit back and relax as Mark runs through these questions.

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A new report by The State of Local News Project at Northwestern University shows that where you live and how much money you make affect whether you live in a news desert or a news oasis. | Photo by Gary Hershorn/via Getty Images

A recent report by The State of Local News Project at Northwestern University documents the changing local news landscape across the country. Among other findings, it shows how many news outlets are operating in each county across the country. Southern Indiana, for example, has more counties classified as news deserts than news oases. Republished from The Conversation.

Beth Edwards was an award-winning environmental journalist for the Indiana Environmental Reporter, based in Bloomington. Limestone Post is republishing four of her most impactful reporting projects: on coal ash, confined animal feeding operations, Martinsville’s drinking water, and a coal-to-diesel plant that had been planned in southern Indiana. | Photos by Beth Edwards (top left and bottom right) and Matthew Kaplan (bottom left); illustration by Sophia Chryssovergis

Beth Edwards was an award-winning environmental reporter who, along with Enrique Saenz, developed the Indiana Environmental Reporter at Indiana University into a source for environmental news that was respected statewide and nationally. Limestone Post looks at four of her reporting projects: on coal ash, confined animal feeding operations, Martinsville’s drinking water, and a controversial coal-to-diesel plant. Read Beth Edwards’s work here.

Indiana ranks among the worst in the country for policies that strengthen rural education and support the learning and development of rural students, according to a report by the National Rural Education Association. | Photo by WR Heustis/Pexels

“School Matters” is a new Limestone Post column by journalist Steve Hinnefeld that will cover local and regional education, as well as statewide legislation that could affect schools in our community. In this first article, Hinnefeld looks at Indiana’s low national ranking for policies that address rural schools and rural students. Click here for School Matters.

The Richardson Farm — Close to my home is this scene. When the elements are right, it’s in view from my front yard. There was so much going on with the weather. It had just stormed and the sun was coming back out.

Three Local Photographers Share Motivations, Techniques, Photos

Matt Brookshire, Megan Snook, and Jeff Danielson are Monroe County–based photographers who have different techniques, motivations, and subjects for their art. They have also led interesting lives outside of photography. Erin Hollinden talked with all of them, and they shared some of their work with Limestone Post. Click here for their stories and photographs.

Parents working multiple jobs, college students struggling financially, elderly veterans with serious health conditions, people living in rural areas with limited food options. … These are just some of the folks who experience food insecurity. The people working to fight hunger in Monroe County say they can’t keep up with the demand. Above, a storage trailer outside of Hoosier Hills Food Bank. | Photo by Olivia Bianco

One Emergency from Catastrophe: Who Struggles with Food Insecurity? Deep Dive: WFHB & Limestone Post Investigate Food Insecurity

Parents working multiple jobs, college students struggling financially, elderly veterans with health conditions. These are just some of the folks who experience food insecurity in our community. People working to fight hunger in Monroe County say they can’t keep up with the demand. This first article in a two-part series will look at the problem. Click here for a Deep Dive into food insecurity.

The Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program encourages young Hoosier scholars to “engage with each other and with state leaders to improve the quality of life in Indiana.” The ten high school seniors pictured above were named the finalists in Monroe County. (top row, l-r) William Foley, Lucy Tait, Dominic D’Onofrio, Teagan Hanna, Kyle Davis; (bottom row, l-r) Ingrid Pendergast, Dylan Stringer, Anson Reynolds, Joshua Tait, Layla Vamos. | Courtesy photos

Monroe County Finalists for the Lilly Endowment Scholarship 10 High School Seniors Chosen for Academic Performance, Civic Engagement, Community Participation

The Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program encourages young Hoosier scholars to “engage with each other and with state leaders to improve the quality of life in Indiana.” Among the ten high school seniors named finalists in Monroe County, two will receive four-year college tuition. Laurie D. Borman spoke with several of the inspiring students. Click here to meet the finalists for the Lilly Endowment Scholarship.

Since 1985, Funny Times magazine has published work by some of the biggest names in editorial cartoons and satire, lampooning politicians, celebrities, and almost everything else. The magazine now makes its home in Bloomington and is published by wife-and-husband team Renae Lesser and Gabriel Piser and edited by Mia Beach.

‘We Are Living in Funny Times’ Cartoon and humor magazine makes its home in Bloomington

“More than ever, the world needs humor,” says Ray Lesser, co-founder of Funny Times. Since 1985, the humor magazine has published work by some of the biggest names in editorial cartoons and satire, lampooning politicians, celebrities, and almost everything else. Now based in Bloomington, the magazine is co-published by Lesser’s daughter, Renae, and her husband. Click here to read Michael G. Glab’s story about Funny Times.

Some visitors enjoy New Harmony, a “wonderfully preserved” town along the Wabash River in southwestern Indiana, for its unusual history. Others are attracted by a more spiritual connection. (center) Interdenominational Roofless Church, (clockwise from top left) Harmonist Labyrinth, cabin at Harmonie State Park, Working Men’s Institute, Yellow Tavern, A.C. Thomas House (courtesy photo), and Atheneum Visitor Center. | Photos by Laurie D. Borman

Travel with Laurie: Historical and Spiritual New Harmony, ‘a Thin Space’

In Laurie D. Borman’s second travel piece for Limestone Post, she takes us to New Harmony, a town along the Wabash River in southwestern Indiana. Some visitors enjoy the “wonderfully preserved” town and its unusual history. Others are attracted by a more spiritual connection. As one shop owner puts it, “This is a town you feel.” Click here to travel with Laurie to New Harmony.

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  • Random Quote

    “I talk to people who grew up here, and they can’t live in their hometown because they can’t afford it.” —Tonda Radewan, coordinator of the Eviction Prevention Project in Monroe County, in “Struggling with Housing Supply, Stability, and Subsidies” by Steve Hinnefeld, for part 1 of the series “Deep Dive: WFHB and Limestone Post Investigate”
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