A 25-foot-tall sasquatch at Patoka Lake has become a sensation, drawing tourists from across the state and beyond. The shaggy beast — named Otis and made from poplar, white pine, and other materials by the Bear Hollow carving team — adds another attraction to Orange County’s tourism, which is “a major driver” in its economy. By Carol Johnson of the Southern Indiana Business Report.

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    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    May 24, 2024

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The wide-ranging issues about protecting Indiana’s wetlands present a conflict between people who advocate for the critical functions wetlands provide and those who say wetland regulations drive up construction prices and hamper growth. Above, a swamp in Beanblossom Bottoms in Monroe County. | Photo by Anne Kibbler

Laws protecting Indiana wetlands have been rolled back in recent years. Some people argue that wetlands must be preserved because of the critical functions they provide. Others say wetland regulations drive up construction prices and hamper growth. This Deep Dive by Anne Kibbler looks at the myriad questions and wide-ranging issues in the debate over Indiana’s wetlands. Read it here.

The mobile integrated health program in Monroe County, which works with local health organizations to provide one-on-one care to patients, is part of a nationwide trend to help fill gaps in the healthcare system. Above, community EMTs work in the Bloomington Fire Department’s MIH program (l-r): Trisha Rademachir, Lily Blackwell, Shelby VanDerMoere (program manager), and Amber Stewart. Not pictured is newest MIH Daniel Stidd. | Photo provided by Shelby VanDerMoere

The mobile integrated health program in Monroe County works with local health organizations to provide one-on-one care to patients, emphasizing a non-emergency approach and increasing efforts to meet people where they live and work. Writer Rebecca Hill takes an in-depth look at MIH programs across the state that are part of a nationwide trend to help fill gaps in the healthcare system. Read about MIH in Indiana.

The co-founders of new theater company Eclipse Productions want to provide additional opportunities for local actors. Their second production, “A Streetcar Named Desire,” opens May 9 at Ted Jones Playhouse in Bloomington.

A new theater company, Eclipse Productions, is taking Bloomington theater in a new direction, writes Hiromi Yoshida. Co-founders Konnor Graber, Kate Weber, and Jeremy J Weber want “to take chances and to push the boundaries of the craft.” Their second production opens May 9 at Ted Jones Playhouse. Plus, keep up with other theater companies in our area.

Indiana primary elections on May 7 start with early voting in Monroe County on April 9. This Limestone Post voter guide includes info on registration, early voting, mail-in voting, and more. Additional info, such as candidate comments on key issues, is included from the League of Women Voters, Indiana Capital Chronicle, and The Indiana Citizen, among others. | Limestone Post

Voter Guide for 2024 Indiana Primary Elections Plus, some candidates respond to questions by League of Women Voters

Indiana primary elections on May 7 start with early voting in Monroe County on April 9. This Limestone Post voter guide includes info on registration, early voting, mail-in voting, etc. More info, such as candidate comments on key issues, is included from the League of Women Voters, Indiana Capital Chronicle, and The Indiana Citizen, among others. Read our 2024 Voter Guide.

“Tactility,” a triptych by Rejon Taylor. Among the work of more than two dozen artists featured in the Regional Artist Exhibit at Juniper Art Gallery in Bloomington are two other paintings by Rejon Taylor, an inmate on death row at the U.S. Penitentiary in Terre Haute. Laura Lasuertmer, Taylor’s “Minister of Record,” writes about Taylor’s artwork and how it relates to the “depravity of his current environment.”

Juniper Gallery To Show Art of Death Row Inmate Rejon Taylor Special to Limestone Post

Laura Lasuertmer is the “Minister of Record” for death row inmate Rejon Taylor, who’s among more than 25 artists featured in the Regional Artist Exhibit at Juniper Art Gallery this spring. Some of Taylor’s artwork, LaSuertmer writes, captures both “what he remembers of the natural world … and the depravity of his current environment.” See and read about Rejon Taylor’s art.

The total solar eclipse on April 8 is generating excitement across much of Indiana. Many people in Bloomington and neighboring communities are celebrating the event with art. Limestone is the medium one local artist and his stone-carver cousin are using to recognize, celebrate, and remember the event.

The Art of Totality: Celestial Celebrations in the Hoosier State Bloomington will celebrate the 2024 solar eclipse through art

Bloomington and neighboring communities are preparing a rush of activity for the solar eclipse on April 8. And it wouldn’t be a Bloomington celebration, writes Dason Anderson, if art wasn’t involved. One artist and his stone-carver cousin have made it even more local, with limestone sculptures to recognize, celebrate, and remember the event for eons. See what’s happening for the eclipse.

One out of ten Bloomington residents struggles with food insecurity. A patchwork system of food banks, community kitchens, food-assistance programs, and other initiatives helps people get healthful food, but experts say it doesn’t address the root of the problem: poverty. | Photo by Olivia Bianco

‘Patchwork’ of Aid for Food Insecurity Doesn’t Address Its Cause Deep Dive: WFHB & Limestone Post Investigate Food Insecurity, Part 2

One out of ten Bloomington residents struggles with food insecurity — having limited or uncertain access to food. A patchwork system of food banks, community kitchens, food-assistance programs, and other initiatives helps people get healthful food, but experts say it doesn’t address the root of the problem: poverty. Read part 2 of our Deep Dive into food insecurity.

Mark Stosberg (left) and Taufique Hussain on Maple Grove Road during a recent 21-mile run (which Stosberg says became a 26.7-mile run). | Limestone Post

Why I Found Myself Running 50 Miles Alone in the Wintertime

One recent winter, Mark Stosberg set out on a 50-mile run. He wasn’t racing in or training for an event, so at some point he had to answer the question, Why keep going? To test his physical and mental limits? To satisfy a primal instinct? Or was it therapeutic in some way? Sit back and relax as Mark runs through these questions.

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  • Random Quote

    “I talk to people who grew up here, and they can’t live in their hometown because they can’t afford it.” —Tonda Radewan, coordinator of the Eviction Prevention Project in Monroe County, in “Struggling with Housing Supply, Stability, and Subsidies” by Steve Hinnefeld, for part 1 of the series “Deep Dive: WFHB and Limestone Post Investigate”
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