While Matt Hart says his latest book, “FAMILIAR: via Walt Whitman, obliterated from the Spanish of León Felipe,” is a new work “that enacts/evokes some resemblances” to Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself,” he says the two poems are “wildly different” from each other.

Matt Hart’s book-length poem FAMILIAR is called “a joyous obliteration” of Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself,” by way of a Spanish version of Whitman’s poem by León Felipe. Local poet Hiromi Yoshida interviewed Hart about his work and specifically this book, which was published by an imprint of local publisher Ledge Mule Press. | Click here to read about Matt Hart and FAMILIAR.

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    Welcome to Limestone Post, an independent magazine committed to publishing informative and inclusive stories about Bloomington, Indiana, and the surrounding areas. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, our mission is to focus on solutions-based journalism, as well covering the arts, outdoors, social-justice issues, and more. You can donate here and subscribe for free! If you’d like to learn more, send us an email.

    June 1, 2023

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Gingko, bald cypress, sassafras, and paw-paw are just a few of the notable species of trees that give Indiana University’s Bloomington campus its “entrancing” appeal. Trees and green spaces have received “great care” ever since the current campus was established, writes Laurie D. Borman. The sprawling tree above, at the edge of Dunn Meadow, north of Indiana Memorial Union, is suspected of being the oldest tree on campus: a bur oak about 180 years old. | Photo by Jeremy Hogan

Ginkgo, bur oak, bald cypress, sassafras, and paw-paw are just a few of the notable trees that — in addition to their practical value — give Indiana University’s Bloomington campus its “entrancing” appeal. Since IU bought twenty acres from Moses Fell Dunn in 1883, writes Laurie D. Borman, great care has been given to IU’s beloved trees. Click here for an article and photo gallery on the trees of IU.

Bloomington has become a hub of comedy in the Midwest for seasoned, touring professionals and young, local comedians, says writer Christine Brackenhoff. And while Bloomington’s comedy fans are welcoming, they’re also known to give genuine feedback. (clockwise from top left) Emil Wakim (photo by Tall and Small Photography), Shanda Sung (photo by Christine Brackenhoff), Emily Davis (courtesy photo), Mat Alano-Martin (photo by Christine Brackenhoff), Harlan Kelly (courtesy photo), Maria Bluck (photo by Tall and Small Photography), and James Tanford (photo by Christine Brackenhoff).

Bloomington has become a hub of comedy in the Midwest for many reasons, writes Christine Brackenhoff. For young comedians, seasoned professionals, and savvy comedy fans, Bloomington is home to a dynamic and welcoming comedy environment. With the Limestone Comedy Festival celebrating its 10th year next month, here’s a look at the local laugh scene. Click here to read Christine’s article.

In the 1960s and ’70s, a generation that was told not to trust anyone over 30 nevertheless adored Hoosier writer Kurt Vonnegut Jr. | Photo by Ulf Andersen/Getty Images

Kurt Vonnegut gave dozens of quirky commencement addresses in his lifetime. He made some preposterous claims, made people laugh, and made them think. They were speeches college graduates remembered, says Susan Farrell, an English professor and founding member of the international Kurt Vonnegut Society. Vonnegut’s advice, she says, still matters to graduates today. Click here to read why, and so on.

A new queen emerges from a queen cell in a honey bee hive of writer and beekeeper Erin Hollinden. Honey bee populations in the U.S. have declined from 6 million in the 1940s to 2.5 million today. But more than 200,000 hobbyist beekeepers such as Erin are trying to keep them (and ultimately us) alive. | Photo by Marla Bitzer

Local Beekeepers Labor with Love as Honey Bees Decline Worldwide

Honey bee populations in the U.S. have declined from 6 million in the 1940s to 2.5 million today. Pesticides, drought, and habitat destruction, are just a few reasons the bees are dying. But more than 200,000 hobbyist beekeepers, like writer Erin Hollinden, are trying to keep them (and ultimately us) alive. Click here to read Erin’s article.

The First Baptist Church (Colored) in West Baden Springs was built in 1920 for the many Black employees of the West Baden Springs Hotel. By 2014, it had fallen into disrepair, but a group of Bloomington residents, including historian Elizabeth Mitchell, renovated it. | Photo by Elizabeth Mitchell

Travel with Laurie: Historic Treasures in French Lick and West Baden Springs

“Travel with Laurie” is a new Limestone Post series by Laurie D. Borman about the sundry and fascinating travel destinations in southern Indiana. In her first article, Laurie explores some of the historic treasures in and around the highly rated resort towns of French Lick and West Baden Springs. Click here to hop aboard!

Bloomington and Monroe County have already received their first payments from the first opioid settlement, but none of it has been spent. Many health service providers wonder where the money will go. NaloxBoxes, like the one above at the IU Health Center, are among the uses approved by the state as part of the settlement documents. | Photo by Benedict Jones

How Will Opioid Settlement Monies Be Spent — and Who Decides? Deep Dive: WFHB & Limestone Post Investigate

Bloomington and Monroe County have already received their first payments from the first opioid settlement, and health providers wonder where the money will go. In this article for the series “Deep Dive: WFHB & Limestone Post Investigate,” Rebecca Hill interviewed state and local officials to report on the issue and its possible solutions. Click here for the article.

Kara Schmidt (above) teaches students in Throop Elementary School in Paoli. Her work is part of a partnership between Orange County schools and Thrive Orange County, a “coalition of community leaders and citizens committed to creating a safe, stable, nurturing community for all.” What started in 2019 with Schmidt teaching just one class for two days a week now has her teaching 40 classes, kindergarten through 6th grade, at schools in Paoli and Orleans. | Photo by Faith Gammon

Public Schools in Orange County Rely on Unique Health Partnerships

While public schools in Indiana are facing key policy and budgetary challenges, the Orange County public school districts in southern Indiana are working to overcome the challenges children face, via unique initiatives and innovative health-care partnerships, writes Keri Jean Miksza, an advocate with the Indiana Coalition for Public Education–Monroe County. Click here to read Keri’s article.

Creating gardens that are resilient to the vagaries of Indiana weather, says gardener and writer Jami Scholl, requires working with the forces of nature and the “limiting factors of sunlight, water, and soil.” | Photo by Jami Scholl

Resilient Gardens Bend to the Will of Mother Nature

How to create a garden that is resilient to the vagaries of Indiana weather? Jami Scholl, a writer and gardener who was active in the early stages of the urban agriculture movement in Bloomington, says we must work with the forces of nature and “the basic environmental limiting factors of sunlight, water, and soil.” Click here for Jami’s tips on creating a resilient garden.

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  • Random Quote

    “I talk to people who grew up here, and they can’t live in their hometown because they can’t afford it.” —Tonda Radewan, coordinator of the Eviction Prevention Project in Monroe County, in “Struggling with Housing Supply, Stability, and Subsidies” by Steve Hinnefeld, for part 1 of the series “Deep Dive: WFHB and Limestone Post Investigate”
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