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One Year, 100 Stories — Thank You, Readers!

Editorial Director Lynae Sowinski reflects on the first 100 stories in our first year of publishing Limestone Post Magazine. We’re grateful for the gifted contributors we get to work with, the vast range of stories that our savvy readers enjoy, and the chance to cover all the important topics that make Bloomington and southern Indiana so vibrant — and so vital. The response to our magazine has been beyond our wildest expectations. Thanks to everyone involved with Limestone Post for a fantastic launch year! Click here to read the full story.

IU to Showcase Artists with Massive Monthly Festival

Recognizing the wealth of “artists and thinkers” on campus, the IU Arts and Humanities Council has created the First Thursdays Festival at Showalter Arts Plaza. The monthly event will “celebrate and showcase” a range of arts — musical, visual, performance, and other creative endeavors — free and open to the public. Click here to read the full story.

Destination Small Town: Vevay, a Small Town with Big Wine

Older than the state itself, Vevay, Indiana, was home of the first successful commercial winery in the United States. The town is also built for tourists — in the best possible way. Its 1,600 residents put on 16 festivals annually. Their flagship event, the Swiss Wine Festival, is August 25-28. Besides, how many towns have a song named after them? Click here to read the full story.

Queer Space, Post-Orlando: Can Karaoke Save the Misfit?

Many people think what’s happening at The Back Door is culturally transformative,” Zak Szymanski writes about Bloomington’s only queer bar. In a post-Orlando world, places like The Back Door, with “its diversity and ideology,” are becoming sanctuaries for the disenfranchised — and “the future of LGBT space." Click here to read the full story.

Are Market Forces Ruining B-town’s ‘Sense of Place’?

Bloomington’s downtown landscape has changed dramatically in the past decade — influenced more by college students who desire modern amenities than by longtime residents who want to preserve their hometown. Writer Sarah Gordon considers how the conflicting goals of property development and historic preservation affect our “sense of place.” Click here to read the full story.

Farm to Yarn: The Craft Part 3 of a 3-Part Series on the Life of Local Fiber

In parts one and two of her “Farm to Yarn” series, Lindsay Welsch Sveen procured yarn from its source and learned how to dye it. In this finale, she finds help with knitting “magical creations” — socks! Click here to read the full story.

200 Road Trips to Explore Hoosier Country’s 200th

Are your travel plans more likely to favor French Lick over France, or Yellowwood over Yellowstone? Do you find road maps more interesting than flight plans? If you’re tempted to hit the road this summer to explore Indiana for its bicentennial, several new books can help guide your way. Click here to read the full story.

New Pekin, Ind., Has ‘Oldest’ 4th of July Celebration in the Nation

Every year since 1830, a small town in southern Indiana has celebrated the 4th of July, making it what the townspeople (and The Library of Congress) say is the “Oldest Consecutive 4th of July Celebration in the Nation.” Writer Michael Waterford looks into this event, which rivals those in towns hundreds of times its size. Click here to read the full story.

One World’s ‘New Business Model’ Opens Doors for Startups

Jeff Mease, co-founder of One World Enterprises, has long shared his business knowledge — and even his commissary — with numerous startups. Now the guy who’s “fascinated about localism” has doubled-down on his collaborative business model with a new, bigger commissary, which he will share with other entrepreneurs in his KitchenShare program. Click here for the full story.

Outfitted: Paddling the Lakes and Rivers of Southern Indiana

Adventure-travel writer, outfitter, and explorer of the unknown, Michael Waterford says some of the best excursions can be had in southern Indiana. In this introduction to paddling, he offers suggestions on how to get on local lakes and rivers. It’s the first step, he says, to saving them. Click here to read the full story.

Explore — Even Dive Into — Quarries During Limestone Month

The news about Rooftop Quarry suddenly becoming inaccessible has made many people sad. But during Indiana Limestone Month in June, you can take guided tours of three nearby quarries — and even swim in the quarries at White Rock Park near Shelbyville. Limestone Post’s Editorial Director Lynae Sowinski has all the details. Click here to read the story.

These New Photos Show Rooftop Is Inaccessible But Not Destroyed

Rooftop Quarry has been a local landmark for generations. But, citing “public safety concerns,” the company has taken measures to make the popular swimming hole safer by making it less accessible. View new photos of the quarry, which was featured in the 1979 movie Breaking Away. Click here for the full story and to view the photos.